RS232 CODES  
  Using RS232 codes to control consumer electronic equipment  
  Currently many electronic devices used in the consumer electronics market, especially the audio visual market, are designed to be controlled via a RS232 port (RS-232 Serial Port). For most devices, the RS232 port allows a user to control the device directly from a host computer or other device acting as a host computer.

Why might this be beneficial? Typically these consumer electronic devices are sold with an infrared remote control. The remote control is used to activate many of the most common functions on the electronic device. However, there are many more functions which the user may want access to that are not included on the remote control. Remote controls have a limited number of buttons, so not all functions are included. Also, many remote controls are set up such that one button will loop through a sequence of related features. Take INPUTS for example. A single button on the remote will loop through RGB1, RGB2, RGB2, Component 1, Component 2, Video 1, Video 2, S-Video etc. If someone is using a high end remote control with macro sequence programming features and needs to make sure the equipment is switched to Video 1 for a specific macro, there becomes the problem of how many times does one program the "Input" button to get to RGB1? It all depends on where the equipment starts off. Sometimes Input must be pressed 3 times, sometimes 4 or more. The RS232 codes provide an easy way to go directly to a specific input, since most manufacturers create unique RS232 codes for specific functions on the equipment. So, Video 1 will have a unique RS232 code string, and Video 2 will have another unique RS232 code string. If these RS232 codes are now added to a macro sequence on the programmable remote, the device will always be switched to the correct Input. Inputs are only one example. The many RS232 codes available for a piece of equipment will depend not only on the features of the device (a Matrix Switcher will not have volume control RS232 codes for example), but also depend on what the manufacturer decided to include. Some equipment has RS232 codes for specific volume levels. Want to get to Volume 47? For some equipment there is a specific RS232 code for that volume.

The next obvious question is what if you don't want to use a computer to control your equipment? Or, how do you get the programmable remote to actually send out the RS232 codes? Well, the answer to both these questions lies in a infrared to RS232 converter. This special infrared receiver will see infrared codes and then in response, send out RS232 codes. The RS232 converter must be programmed or course to not only see the correct infrared codes, but also send out the correct RS232 codes for the specific piece of equipment (since all equipment has different RS232 codes).

There is one such device on the market which handles these tasks very well. Please check out the infrared to RS232 converter from Celadon, the RCV-5000.
 
  INFRARED CODES  
  The RS232 code device mentioned above, the RCV-5000, receives unique infrared codes that have been specifically created for it. These codes come in the .CCF (Pronto), .PCF (Pronto) and .LIN (Niles) format and can easily be loaded into one of these manufacturers remotes, or imported into other remotes that can handle these formats.

Each infrared code is mapped to a specific RS232 code function for the piece of equipment being controlled.

Off-the-shelf remote controls can also be used to control the device. Contact the infrared to RS232 code converter RCV-5000 manufacturer Celadon to see how this can be done. Celadon sells low volume remote controls that can be used for this purpose.
 
  RS232 CODES  
 

Each piece of equipment, be it a Fujitsu Plasma TV, a Runco Projector, or a Key Digital Switch, has a unique set of RS232 codes to access specific functions on the equipment. These RS232 codes are sometimes called data strings, command strings, command data or similar. Some of the RS232 code strings are ASCII, some are HEX and some are a combination of both. They all vary in baud rates, and communication protocols (9600, 8N1 or 19200, 8O1 etc.). Typical baud rates range from 1200 baud all the way up to 115200 baud. The RS232 Code converter must be able to handle these different baud rates and command protocols. The RCV-5000 listed above handles this by using specific firmware files specifically programmed for the piece of equipment. A single RS232 code firmware file is loaded into the RCV-5000 for the specific piece of equipment. In the above examples, a specific model of Fujitsu Plasma will have it's unique RS232 code firmware file. The Runco Projector will have a different RS232 code firmware file. All the files are pre-setup such that baud rate and command protocols are already programmed.

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EXAMPLE:

-NEC Plasma TV -

Command for switching directly to Video 1 input :

DF 80 60 47 01 01 08

The above HEX RS232 Code string is sent from the RCV-5000 to the NEC Plasma TV at 9600 baud, 8, odd, 1 (these command protocols are preprogrammed into the RCV-5000 along with all the RS232 code strings for the NEC Plasma TV) . Using a Pronto remote and an RCV-5000 loaded with the NEC Plasma TV RS232 Code Firmware (see below table) the user can directly access Video 1 by pressing the 0 (zero) button on the Pronto while aiming the Pronto at the RCV-5000.

The RCV-5000 is connected to the RS232 port on the NEC Plasma TV (a DB9 serial connector). It is basically plug-and-play.

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To use the same RCV-5000 with a different piece of equipment, you would load a different RS232 code firmware file into the RCV-5000 using software that is provided.


The below list shows many of the RS232 code firmware files already programmed and ready to use by the RCV-5000 infrared to RS232 code converter. Additional equipment is always being added, so please check back frequently.

The actual RS232 code commands are described in seperate spreadsheets. Please contact Celadon should the RS232 code command table not be available on the web site yet.

 
     

RS232 CODES - EQUIPMENT LIST


RS232 Code Files Equipment USing RS232 Codes    
benq2_1r.hex BENQ PB7000 Projector    
calibur2_r.hex GE Calibur DVMR Triplex Digital Video Multiplexer Recorder    
dell2_r.hex Dell 4100MP Projector    
extron1_r.hex Extron SW6 SV A MX Switcher    
extron4_r.hex Extron CrossPoint 88HV Switcher    
farou2_r.hex Faroudja NRS-DVI Digital Video Processor    
feral1_r.hex Feral QS440/1 Quad Switcher    
fujitsu2a.hex Fujitsu 42 inch Plasmas PDS4211E-H, PDS4211W-H, PDS4212E-H, PDS4212W-H, PDS4221, PDS4222    
fujitsu5_r.hex Fujitsu Plasma P50XCA    
infocus2_r.hex InFocus SP7200 Projector    
infocus3_r.hex Infocus LP-820 Projector    
ivision.hex iVision SX+    
keydig1_r.hex Key Digital Flash Matrix Switcher KD-MSW8x3    
keydig2_r.hex Key Digital Matrix Switch KDMSW8x4    
koti2_r.hex KOTI-816NR Video Multiplexer    
marantz1.hex Marantz Plasma Monitor - Model PD5010D    
nect841_r.hex NEC Plasma four plasma monitor 84VP4. Consists of 4 NEC 42VP4 Plasmas    
nectv4_r.hex NEC Plasma TV 42inch and 60 inch and similar Marantz    
nectv5_r.hex NEC Plasma TV 42inch model 42XM2/42VP4/42VP4D    
optoma1_r.hex Optoma HD81 DLP Projector    
panaso1_r.hex Panasonic Plasma and Toshia OEM plasma    
panaso2_r.hex Panasonic Plasma TV Model - TH42PHD6UY    
quadsn1_r.hex Quadscan Elite    
runco3_r.hex Runco PL-50c3611 Projector    
samsng2_r.hex Samsung Synchmaster 403T Display    
sanyo2_r.hex Sanyo DVR3009    
sharp3r.hex Sharp Plasma LC-45G1X and TU-45GAX    
sharp4_r.hex Sharp Projector Model XV-Z2000    
sharp5_r.hex Sharp LCD TV Model LC-65D90U    
toshiba1_r.hex Toshiba MT7 LCD Projector    
toshiba2_r.hex Toshiba HD-XA1 Hi-Def DVD Player    
vidkv31_r.hex Vidkron Vision 3 TV    
viewsonic1.hex Viewsonic Plasma VPw4200/4210    
zenith1_r.hex Zenith Plasma 42 and 60 inch models Only.    

Don't see a piece of equipment listed? Want custom RS232 Codes for a specific application? Please contact Celadon for more information.



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